Posts Tagged ‘natural disasters’

“For we know that the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now.” (Romans 8:22 KJV)

SOLAR ACTIVITY SURGES
SpaceWeather.com
14 May 2013

SolarFlares2013MayA sunspot on the sun’s eastern limb is crackling with powerful X-class solar flares. Just-numbered AR1748 announced itself during the early hours of May 13th with an X1.7-class eruption (0217 UT), quickly followed by an X2.8-class flare (1609 UT) and an X3.2-class flare (0117 UT on May 14). These are the strongest flares of the year so far, and they signal a significant increase in solar activity. NOAA forecasters estimate a 40% chance of more X-flares during the next 24 hours.

All of these flares have produced strong flashes of extreme ultraviolet radiation. Here is the view of the latest eruption, which registered X3.2 on the Richter Scale of Solar Flares, from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.

The explosions have also hurled coronal mass ejections (CMEs) into space. Coronagraphs onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory are tracking the clouds: movie. The planet in the CME movie is Mercury. Although the CMEs appear to hit Mercury, they do not. In fact, no planets were in the line of fire. However, the CMEs appear to be on course to hit NASA’s Epoxi and Spitzer spacecraft on May 15-16.

When the action began on May 13th, the instigating sunspot (just numbered “AR1748”) was hidden behind the sun’s eastern limb, but now solar rotation is bringing the active region into view. The next 24 to 48 hours should reveal much about the sunspot, including its size, magnetic complexity, and potential for future flares. For the moment, there is no reason to expect the explosions to stop. Stay tuned for updates.

http://www.spaceweather.com/

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Ice Tsunami
DailyMail Online
13 May 2013

IceTsunami2013MayIt could be a scene out of a 1950s horror film – an unstoppable ‘ice tsunami’ gradually moving ashore, destroying everything in its path. But video footage actually shows the weather phenomenon known as ice floe in action in Minnesota, North America, over the weekend. Strong winds are responsible for pushing this sheet of ice off the top of Lake Mille Lacs and up over the shoreline right up to resident’s doorsteps. Darla Johnson uploaded footage of a sheet of ice rising out of Milles Lacs Lake towards her home in Izatys Resort, Minnesota.

The ice flow phenomenon is caused by strong winds driving the ice ashore. Footage filmed by a homeowner shows the eerie ice shards slowly covering ground before eventually creeping into people’s home. National Weather Service Meteorologist Shawn Devinny says 30 to 40 mile an hour winds pushed the water into the ice, driving it ashore. The Department of Natural Resources says about 10 miles of shoreline are covered, with some reaching up to 30 feet high.

Massive ice floes rose out of a lake 600 miles north in Canada over the weekend, destroying a dozen homes and damaging fifteen others. Winds forced massive walls of ice onto the shores of Lake Dauphin, dwarfing homes in rural Manitoba, Canada on Friday. A dozen homes were destroyed and many others left uninhabitable after winds piled ice onto Ochre Beach Friday in an unusually large ice flow. By Friday night, a state of emergency had been declared in the town of Ochre River, a 188 miles northwest of Winnipeg.

Click here for video: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2323850/Ice-tsunami-captured-camera-rising-lake-destroying-homes-residents-watch-helplessly-shore.html

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“Slow-Motion Disaster” Is Swallowing Homes in Northern California
AllGov.com
13 May 2013

HouseSwallowedPhoto Robin and Scott Spivey walk past their home. It didn’t take former building inspector Scott Spivey long to figure out that something was terribly wrong when his house in Lake County, about 100 miles north of San Francisco, started developing cracks that rapidly turned into fissures.

Two weeks later, his garage lay 10 feet below street level and his neighbors’ homes were collapsing, but no one could tell them why it was happening. Resident Randall Fitzgerald told the Associated Press it was “a slow moving disaster.”

Within a short time, eight homes in the 30-year-old, hilly volcanic subdivision had to be abandoned and around two dozen more were threatened. The assumption was that the hill was somehow being eroded by water, but a dry winter and groundwater shortages seemed to belie that notion.

http://www.allgov.com/usa/ca/news/unusual-news/slow-motion-disaster-is-swallowing-homes-in-northern-california-130513?news=849998
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Couple Escapes As Landslide Destroys Cabin
Alaska Public Media
13 May 2013

LandslideRedoubtTwo people are safe after a massive landslide destroyed the cabin they were camping in Sunday morning (5-13-13) near Sitka. An air taxi pilot rescued the pair from a debris field estimated to be 20 feet deep.

All their belongings were buried in the slide. Their dog (Luna) remains missing. Kevin Knox, 41, and his girlfriend Maggie Gallin, 28, were staying at Redoubt Lake, a popular Forest Service recreation cabin about 15 miles southeast of Sitka. The cabin is located at the head of the valley, and is surrounded by steep mountain slopes and rocky cliffs that climb 4,000 feet above the surface of the lake.

“We had just tied the boat up and Maggie was in the cabin, and it just let loose — a huge piece off of the side of the mountain. I yelled for Maggie to run, to get out of the cabin. We started running down the beach. We were running along the lakeshore and got thrown into the water, trees kind of toppling on top of us. We both popped up three or four feet from each other. Then we got our wits about us and just tried to hunker down.”

Knox and Gallin were soaked to the skin. The cabin — and all their belongings — were under a debris field Knox thinks is about 20 feet deep. They wrung out clothes and tried to shelter as best they could until their scheduled pick up three hours later. Luna possibly escaped with Knox and Gallin, but remains missing.

http://www.alaskapublic.org/2013/05/13/couple-escapes-as-landslide-destroys-cabin/

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13 Incredible Pictures from the Washington State Landslide
The Blaze
28 March 2013

APTOPIX Washington LandslideGeologists and engineers are assessing the stability of a scenic Puget Sound area after a large landside thundered down a hillside, knocking one house off its foundation and threatening others.

That heavily damaged home and 33 others were ordered evacuated after the slide broke loose early Wednesday in the Ledgewood community on Whidbey Island, about 50 miles north of Seattle. Click link below for additional photographs.

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/03/28/13-incredible-pictures-from-the-washington-state-landslide/

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From many sources 13 January 2011 come news of floods, severe snow and ice storms, a new eruption from a very old active volcano – as well as political uprisings in several nations. The most interesting of those to me is the government falling in Lebanon. Here are links to the various stories just from one day…

More floods:

Australia: http://bit.ly/elziqY

Brazil: http://bit.ly/gSVRI6

Sri Lanka: http://bbc.in/hxsbRz

Snow and ice storms across the United States: http://gaw.kr/ihMXF4

Mt. Etna erupts again: http://bit.ly/gUhoV6

Lebanon government falls: http://fxn.ws/dHMkLC

And the President of Tunisia has left the country due to massive protests in that North African nation: http://reut.rs/ialgyg

Stay tuned.

Blood Red Moon and “The Day of the Lord”
(Title quoted from Joel Rosenberg’s webblog, 21 Dec 2010)

This was the first total lunar eclipse – a startling blood red moon – during the Winter solstice since 1638. The next one like this doesn’t occur until December 21, 2094. It’s particularly interesting in light of two Bible prophecies:

  • “The sun will be turned to darkness and the moon to blood before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the LORD.” (Joel 2:31)
  • “There will be signs in the sun, moon and stars.” (Luke 21:25)

It’s also interesting considering the enormous number of natural disasters that have occurred this year, including devastating earthquakes, volcanoes, blizzards and floods.

The following is excerpted from an AP article in the Salt Lake Tribune 19 December 2010:

2010’s world gone wild: Quakes, floods, blizzards

This was the year the Earth struck back. More people were killed worldwide by natural disasters in 2010 than have been killed in terrorist attacks in the past 40 years combined.

Earthquakes, heat waves, floods, volcanoes, super typhoons, blizzards, landslides and droughts killed at least a quarter million people in 2010 — the deadliest year in more than a generation.

“It just seemed like it was back-to-back and it came in waves,” said Craig Fugate, who heads the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency. It handled a record number of disasters in 2010. “The term ‘100-year event’ really lost its meaning this year.”

Even though many catastrophes have the ring of random chance, the hand of man made this a particularly deadly, costly, extreme and weird year for everything from wild weather to earthquakes.

Poor construction and development practices conspire to make earthquakes more deadly than they need be. More people live in poverty in vulnerable buildings in crowded cities. That means that when the ground shakes, the river breaches, or the tropical cyclone hits, more people die.

Disasters from the Earth, such as earthquakes and volcanoes “are pretty much constant,” said Andreas Schraft, vice president of catastrophic perils for the Geneva-based insurance giant Swiss Re. “All the change that’s made is man-made.”

In the summer, one weather system caused oppressive heat in Russia, while farther south it caused flooding in Pakistan that inundated 62,000 square miles, about the size of Wisconsin. That single heat-and-storm system killed almost 17,000 people, more people than all the worldwide airplane crashes in the past 15 years combined.

Preliminary data show that 18 countries broke their records for the hottest day ever. “The Earth strikes back in cahoots with bad human decision-making,” said a weary Debarati Guha Sapir, director for the World Health Organization’s Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters.

“It’s almost as if the policies, the government policies and development policies, are helping the Earth strike back instead of protecting from it. We’ve created conditions where the slightest thing the Earth does is really going to have a disproportionate impact.”

Here’s a quick tour of an anything but normal 2010:

While the Haitian earthquake, Russian heat wave, and Pakistani flooding were the biggest killers, deadly quakes also struck Chile, Turkey, China and Indonesia in one of the most active seismic years in decades. Through mid-December there have been 20 earthquakes of magnitude 7.0 or higher, compared to the normal 16.

Flooding alone this year killed more than 6,300 people in 59 nations through September. Inundated countries include China, Italy, India, Colombia and Chad.

Super Typhoon Megi with winds of more than 200 mph devastated the Philippines and parts of China.

Through Nov. 30, nearly 260,000 people died in natural disasters in 2010, compared to 15,000 in 2009, according to Swiss Re. By comparison, deaths from terrorism from 1968 to 2009 were less than 115,000, according to reports by the U.S. State Department and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

After strong early year blizzards — nicknamed Snowmageddon — paralyzed the U.S. mid-Atlantic and record snowfalls hit Russia and China, the temperature turned to broil.

The year may go down as the hottest on record worldwide or at the very least in the top three, according to the World Meteorological Organization. The average global temperature through the end of October was 58.53 degrees, a shade over the previous record of 2005, according to the National Climatic Data Center.

Los Angeles had its hottest day in recorded history on Sept. 27: 113 degrees. In May, 129 set a record for Pakistan and may have been the hottest temperature recorded in an inhabited location.

In the U.S. Southeast, the year began with freezes in Florida that had cold-blooded iguanas becoming comatose and falling off trees. Then it became the hottest summer on record for the region. As the year ended, unusually cold weather was back in force.

Northern Australia had the wettest May-October on record, while the southwestern part of that country had its driest spell on record. And parts of the Amazon River basin struck by drought hit their lowest water levels in recorded history.

Disasters caused $222 billion in economic losses in 2010 — more than Hong Kong’s economy — according to Swiss Re.

A volcano in Iceland paralyzed air traffic for days in Europe, disrupting travel for more than 7 million people. Other volcanoes in the Congo, Guatemala, Ecuador, the Philippines and Indonesia sent people scurrying for safety. New York City had a rare tornado.

A nearly 2-pound hailstone that was 8 inches in diameter fell in South Dakota in July to set a U.S. record. The storm that produced it was one of seven declared disasters for that state this year.

There was not much snow to start the Winter Olympics in a relatively balmy Vancouver, British Columbia, while the U.S. East Coast was snowbound.

In a 24-hour period in October, Indonesia got the trifecta of terra terror: a deadly magnitude 7.7 earthquake, a tsunami that killed more than 500 people and a volcano that caused more than 390,000 people to flee. That’s after flooding, landslides and more quakes killed hundreds earlier in the year.

Even the extremes were extreme. This year started with a good sized El Nino weather oscillation that causes all sorts of extremes worldwide. Then later in the year, the world got the mirror image weather system with a strong La Nina, which causes a different set of extremes. Having a year with both a strong El Nino and La Nina is unusual.

And in the United States, FEMA declared a record number of major disasters, 79 as of Dec. 14. The average year has 34. A list of day-by-day disasters in 2010 compiled by the AP runs 64 printed pages long.

“The extremes are changed in an extreme fashion,” said Greg Holland, director of the earth system laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

For example, even though it sounds counterintuitive, global warming likely played a bit of a role in “Snowmageddon” earlier this year, Holland said. That’s because with a warmer climate, there’s more moisture in the air, which makes storms including blizzards, more intense, he said.

It was also a year of man-made technological catastrophes. BP’s busted oil well caused 172 million gallons to gush into the Gulf of Mexico.

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/world/50904909-68/disasters-record-2010-killed.html.csp

http://www.chinaview.cn 8 Oct 2009: Pacific earthquakes may be related

http://bit.ly/1PY6w5

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Aljazeera 9 Oct 2009: Pacific quakes spark tsunami fears

The US Geological Survey said the first quake, with a magnitude of 7.8, struck 294km northwest of the Vanuatu island of Santo, and 596km northwest of the capital of Port Vila, at a depth of 35km. A second temblor, with a 7.3 magnitude, struck just 15 minutes at the same depth but 35km farther north of Santo and Port Vila. A third quake of magnitude 5.7 was recorded nearly an hour later.

Moments before the Pacific quakes, a magnitude 6.7 tremor struck southeast of the Sulu archipelago of the Philippines, which is still picking up the pieces from a typhoon that killed at least 22 people last week.

http://bit.ly/2FOQKO

philippinestyphoonPhilippines hit hard by typhoons – http://bit.ly/nrbAK

sumatraquakeSumatra villages disappear, thousands still buried by earthquakes – http://bit.ly/12JBaA

samoaquakeSamoan double disasters, two earthquakes and tsunami – http://bit.ly/18BBgF

sicilymudslidesItalian island of Sicily hit by deadly mudslides – http://bit.ly/Sp7pW